HA! Calendar

Wednesday, September 11, 2019


By Adrienne Lauby
Sept. 11, 2019
Article 25:  Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control.

There are five major ways to fulfill the demands of the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights quickly.

1. Sanctioned Encampments (tents)
2. Safe Parking (cars & R.V./Trailers)
3. Tiny Home Villages (bedrooms with communal sanitation and cooking areas)
4. Leave 'em alone - decriminalization  (wrap.org)
5. Major infusion of money from the Federal government.   The Feds cut funds to build low income housing during Ronald Reagan's Presidency by 50% and has never restored the budget, much less caught up with the missing years of housing production.


GENERAL THOUGHTS
Building in elements of self-management, self-empowerment and community in homeless camps, villages and safe parking is crucial to their success.  

It's impossible to talk for long about homelessness without talking about low income housing and poverty.  Both of these are large topics, of course, but consider having some framing about them.  For instance, you can say, "Homelessness is about poverty.  You don't find rich people on the streets.  Donald Trump has had bankruptcies, divorces and other crisis events but, like most rich people, he has back up housing and resources that pick him up before he falls too far."

Don't be misled by the term "affordable housing"  This is basically workforce housing.  Unless it says specifically low-low-housing or no-income housing, it will not be affordable for most homeless people who, at best, are on a fixed income of approx. $1,000 a month.

Don't use the term "homeless"  Use homeless people, homeless folks, or homeless individuals.   Homeless people are individuals.  They are not their condition.

What happens to homeless people's property when they are arrested for being in the "wrong" place, or told to suddenly move on, taking only what they can carry?  This has become a growing legal issue since the U.S. is strong about the right of people to own property.

Officially, 42% of homeless people have a physical or mental disability.  The actual number is much higher.  We could talk about "disabled people living on the street" instead of "homeless people".

There are Tiny Home Villages that cost $200,000 a home and up.  While these are cheaper than market-rate housing, they are a limited solution.


 RESOURCES

1.  Homeless Talk
Homeless Action! and Santa Rosa Together talked to 500 Santa Rosa people in small groups to find out what they are thinking about homelessness.  Qualitative Research Report, Cecile Querubin lead author. 
http://sonomahomeless.fawnmoran.com/homelesstalk.html/  
This same site has an extensive local homeless resource guide.

2.  Homeless Census, Official numbers and statistics from the county's yearly survey.
http://sonomacounty.ca.gov/CDC/Homeless-Services/Homeless-Count/  (scroll down slightly for the pdf of each year's report)

3.  Portrait of Sonoma County
https://sonomacounty.ca.gov/Health/Portrait-of-Sonoma-County/
Another official report, this one produced by the Health Department in 2014.  Delicious statistics and comparisons about the difference in resources in the poorer communities vs the well off communities, and the consequences of these disparities.  Delicious and depressing.

4.  Decriminalization
Non-Solution Solutions to End Homelessness
 https://wraphome.org/2016/08/26/non-solution-solutions-end-homelessness/
This entire website is full of information.  It's located in S.F. but has close connections with grassroots homeless activist groups, especially on the west coast.

5. My favorite doctoral student.
Chris Herring
https://chrisherring.org/
Great academic research on encampments
https://chrisherring.org/mass-homeless-encampments

6.  Tipping Point Community
Interesting new group out of the bay area
https://tippingpoint.org/


MEDIA
1.  Ten Myths about Homelessness Debunked
9-1-19. Medium
One of the best articles I've seen on this topic.  Easy to read and Cory Clark did a great job pulling out the myths.
https://medium.com/@coryvclark.photography/10-myths-about-homelessness-debunked-c250f9de4e4f

2.  10 Tiny House Villages for the Homeless Across the U.S.:  Case studies for a trending idea
7-18-19
Curbed
A good overview.  There are more villages than this, (Seattle has ten all by itself) but this gives a good sense of the diversity in size, management and funding.
https://www.curbed.com/maps/tiny-houses-for-the-homeless-villages?fbclid=IwAR3JHMGo-vJeuAE38UkPhn26ZP4J4Wu808pPSpVV4huBnOp-YITnTNid9rY

3.  Modesto tent city attracting interest from other cities dealing with homelessness
California Official City Tent City
https://www.modbee.com/news/local/article234514447.html?fbclid=IwAR2dYtQgyFmKVh0qoDcbCiV9HPgMua_e8pxsDw5HImIxQwgSVYTxwIOP-H8

4. Column:  He Died Sunday on a West L.A. Sidewalk.  He was Homeless. He is Part of an Epidemic
Good thinking about how homelessness should be considered a health epidemic.  L.A. on track for 1,000 deaths of homeless people in this year alone.
https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2019-09-04/homeless-deaths-los-angeles-coroner-record?utm_source=Today%27s+Headlines&utm_campaign=6d5fcba521-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2016_12_12_COPY_02&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_b04355194f-6d5fcba521-83282501&fbclid=IwAR0Zx_F0efKqmygKKZFGqk__g7KeZGEyT5jP9Pwu-5mVjcfY6-vfc-JRM6k

6.  Road Home Redux : They're fire-resistant and politically connected, but are 'wildfire cottages' the solution to the region's—heck, the state's—housing crisis?
8-28-19
Includes a lot of quotes from the author of this article.
https://www.bohemian.com/northbay/road-home-redux/Content?oid=9143489&fbclid=IwAR3ljwCMGJcWhLzJMvFsb2XYbaWSATKQ8H5PukyZwyBtJ3JBpq5pyXiB3cA

7.  San Jose Tiny Home Village
8-18-19
https://www.kqed.org/news/11768261/san-jose-builds-its-first-ever-tiny-homes-for-the-homeless?fbclid=IwAR2fIXD-EjwXXYdrCKvAcKRrpRW09EKXXONzrdAsIL8l9iEN6N3qJajxu_A

8.  101 Notes on the LA Tenants Union
Commune Magazine
7-19-19
Brilliant re-framing of the housing/homelessness problem
https://communemag.com/101-notes-on-the-la-tenants-union/?fbclid=IwAR0gVQE3tUuXXAR1dcmTPuUh1LxX-syIP5HDlp2BSVBVH_rLvpi2nJu7dr0

9.   Rise of Senior homelessness.  It's true in Sonoma County too.  More and more Californians are old, sick and on the streets. Here’s how we can fight senior homelessness.
https://www.sfchronicle.com/opinion/article/Insight-More-and-more-Californians-are-old-sick-14189671.php?fbclid=IwAR1Ry3_LhlHdtfl6cnN9JOAtJOFPdcsIxEv5q-JdHw0NDClKo3yZt-APFaI


GOVERNMENTS

1.  Santa Rosa
City Ordinances
Kevin Polk, who is a guru for Tiny House building, says Santa Rosa now has the best ordinances In the state for helping displaced people get back on their feet using smaller temporary housing.
https://srcity.org/2674/Resilient-City-Zoning?fbclid=IwAR39cIvA7PYpK5lnjQz16D8RXRBVN9ILTxAfYruLHHLgagI5QWkSv5j-Mxk

Fed Court Injunction for Santa Rosa Homeless Relief
    a.Order for Preliminary Injunction (scroll past the calendar)
    http://voicesonhomelessness.blogspot.com/2019/07/homeless-action-order-for-preliminary.html
    b.  Interview with Adrienne Lauby and Victoria Yanez
    https://soundcloud.com/thomas2cooper/interview-7-30-19?fbclid=IwAR2VSXsRpjAaV-LqB3uT52RcArm9dFwnWHybZuYKkw_GHYUFxlDICbQOxzk


Santa Rosa gives final approval to 54-unit apartment complex for homeless and low-income residents
https://www.pressdemocrat.com/news/9760008-181/santa-rosa-gives-final-approval?artslide=3&sba=AAS&fbclid=IwAR23xU1lW1vGl-huPwHurOoA8Yve_lQOWbHiAhAzLfPbcfk7-4HrWhhPt88

Gold Coin Motel set to be Homeless Housing
7-7-19
https://www.pressdemocrat.com/news/9786679-181/nonprofit-raises-more-money-renegotiates



2.  Rohnert Park
Rohnert Park to spend up to $450,000 more on new homeless initiatives
8-18-19
https://www.pressdemocrat.com/news/9907977-181/rohnert-park-to-spend-up?artslide=3&fbclid=IwAR3PaPV0FtzqQIz0zgNSBDlziHcflARj2J0A7ZOQaLoFHPP8sHep2m_kJNg


3.  Chico
A plan to address homelessness in Chico | Guest commentary
By a City Council member
8-11-19
https://www.chicoer.com/2019/08/11/a-plan-to-address-homelessness-in-chico-guest-commentary/?fbclid=IwAR0lotzG8TgvIrdhXC_IGaKBbGUTJncpts0G9CkFpKYGfE7kXP0LpDGI-GU


4.  San Francisco
S.F. Looking to follow Seattle's Lead
S.F. Chronicle
8-16-19
https://www.facebook.com/humanitycounts/posts/1593008980840820?__tn__=K-R


5.  L.A.
(SAFE PARKING)
Los Angeles restores limits on homeless living in vehicles
https://www.pressdemocrat.com/news/9852511-181/los-angeles-city-council-limits?artslide=0&sba=AAS&fbclid=IwAR1rbA2cJMIkGNhenXXWmwuRMi5DmepbDgi4LkrsuS_GjvsU7K6sA3SH3bw


6.  State of California

Darrell Steinberg's New Initiative
a.  Cities Must Provide Shelter for Homeless People
https://www.sacbee.com/news/local/homeless/article232781027.html
b.  Criticism:
California must not repeat old mistakes as it seeks new ways to end homelessness
8-14-19
https://calmatters.org/commentary/housing/?fbclid=IwAR2G7lnQ6DwtYrDXXojBgj-m19TdDcxefnvbHcinSaBSE_ktBXn9yq-o73w


Last year the State of California gave $500 million to cities and counties for emergency homeless efforts (HEAP).  (My group got its first big grant of $450 thousand to build a tiny home village and R.V. park.).  Oakland spent all their share on tiny home villages and safe parking.  Finding out what happened with all that money would be a research project in itself.  Next year the state is giving less.  This year it will be $650 million (HHAPP) but it's more restricted and less money for Sonoma County by about $3 million bucks. 
https://www.jbaforyouth.org/hhapp/


CHEAP HOUSING/SHELTER
Local guy, beautiful stuff.  May get an official permit for housing structures next year.
https://www.livingearthstructures.com/home

SAVS Tiny Home Villages
Local.   I'm part of this group.  We are setting up a Tiny Home Village and an R.V. Parking Lot.  Stay tuned.

Seattle
The Low Income Housing Institute builds typical affordable housing but it also has built and manages over ten tiny home villages.
https://lihi.org/tiny-houses/

Thursday, August 29, 2019

2020 State Funding for Addressing the Homeless Crisis


Upcoming state funding for Homeless Housing, Assistance, and Prevention Program Program (HHAPP).  
First, it’s less money over a longer period of time ($7 million for April 1, 2020 to December 3, 2025).  
Second, it’s limited in its allowed uses, divided between Continuum of Care and County ($3-4 million each), and has some requirements.

Estimates of $ for Sonoma County:

Santa Rosa, Petaluma/Sonoma County

























For Continuum of Care:  $3,987,194.20
For Sonoma County:  $4,027,593.20
Total: $8,014,707.40

Description of HHAPP


Assembly Bill 101, the Housing Development and Financing trailer bill, which is part of the 2019-2020 State Budget package, has established the Homeless Housing, Assistance, and Prevention Program (HHAPP). This one-time investment of $650 million, administered by the Homeless Coordinating and Financing Council (HCFC) within the California Business, Consumer Services and Housing Agency, will provide jurisdictions with one-time grant funds to support regional coordination and expand or develop local capacity to address homelessness challenges informed by a best-practices framework focused on moving homeless individuals and families into permanent housing and supporting the efforts of those individuals and families to maintain their permanent housing. An explanation of the program parameters is below.

Eligible Applicants & Application Process 
HHAPP applicants are limited to “jurisdictions”—a city, county, or Continuum of Care (CoC). To be eligible, an applicant shall provide: 
• How the jurisdiction has coordinated with other jurisdictions to identify their share of the regional need to address homelessness, and how the requested funds will help meet the jurisdiction’s share of that need; 
• Identification of all funds currently being used to provide housing and homeless services for homeless populations in the jurisdiction;
• An assessment of existing programs to address homelessness and an identification of gaps in housing and services for the homeless populations in the jurisdiction;
• Identiication of how funds requested in the application will complement pre-existing funds, close gaps, and serve the local homeless populations;
• Measurable goals, including individuals served and percentage of individuals successfully placed in permanent housing; and,
• Evidence of connection the with local CoC’s Coordinated Entry System. 
Jurisdictions must also agree to participate in a statewide Homeless Management Information System (HMIS). 
HHAPP applications are due on or before February 15, 2020, and awards determinations will be made no later than April 1, 2020. If funding remains, a second-round of awards may be made.

Available Funding 
HHAPP is granting a total of $650 million. Funding shall be made available based on a regional proportionate share of the total homeless population, based on the 2019 Homeless PointIn-Time Count. The four funding categories are as follows:
 • $190 million available to CoCs;
 • $275 million available to the 13 big cities;
 • $175 million available to counties; and
 • $10 million scheduled for later use. 

Note that the formula for HEAP included giving eight counties with 2017 PIT counts between 2500 and 3000 a base floor of $10 million, plus an amount for their share of the statewide PIT for that year.  HHAP eliminates that floor for those counties in favor of a straight percentage based on their shoe of 2019 PIT counts.  The legislation also states that applicants can include CoCs, counties, and large cities.  While if encourages regionalization, and collaboration,  it is still unclear if Home Sonoma Leadership Council and the County of Sonoma can each apply.

Allowable Uses 
HHAPP awards are for one-time uses to address homelessness using 8 evidence-based solutions: rental assistance, rapid rehousing, operating subsidies to supportive housing units, emergency shelters, and navigation centers; incentives to landlords, such as security deposits and holding feeds; systems support to create regional partnerships and maintain a homeless services and housing delivery system; hotel and motel conversions; prevention and shelter diversion to permanent housing; and new navigation centers and emergency shelters based on demonstrated need. 
Additional stipulations include:
 • A maximum 5% use of funds to meet federal requirements for housing funding, such as developing a strategic homelessness plan or infrastructure to support coordinated entry and the HMIS;
 • A maximum 7% use of funds to cover administrative expenses incurred by the city, county or CoC; and,
 • A minimum spending limit requiring at least 8% use of funds to establish or expand services meeting the needs of homeless youth populations. 

Reporting Requirements & Expenditure Timeline 
HCFC may monitor activities to ensure compliance and request repayment of funds for failure to comply with requirements. HHAPP recipients must submit annual progress reports and a final report, no later than January 1, 2026, regarding the expenditure of funds under the program.

Additionally:
• By May 31, 2023, cities and CoCs must contractually obligate at least 50% of their program funds; counties must contractually obligate 100% of their program funds. 
• For counties, any funds not contractually obligated by May 31, 2023, shall be reverted to the CoC that serves the county. 
• For cities and CoCs, any funds not expended by December 31, 2023, shall be returned to the HCFC. 
• Any funds not expended by June 30, 2025, must be reverted to the General Fund.

Homeless Data Integration System Project
Shortly after the Council was transferred from HCD to BCSH in July 2018, Council Chair Secretary Podesta directed HCFC staff to explore options for developing a California Homeless Data Integration System (CDIS), including a state-level Homeless Management Information System (HMIS). Phase I would include developing a state-level data warehouse that could import and integrate client-level data from all of California’s existing local HMIS and provide an option for CoCs to participate in a state HMIS if they choose to do so. The state HMIS would comply with HUD standards to facilitate federal reporting. 
Additionally, the proposed system would feature data analytics reporting tools, which would be available to both the state and CoCs. This would give the CoCs additional information to assist in policy setting and prioritizing services provided to homeless and at-risk individuals and families. In addition, it would allow the state to better understand the scope and characteristics of homelessness throughout California. Phase II would include the development of an integrated platform that could import and link other client-level data from various state and local homeless programs, which would serve as a powerful, data driven tool used to inform policy and resourcing decisions. The Council would be in a position to provide data-driven advice on formulating sound policy and make recommendations on the most effective and efficient use of funds. 

Exploring Development of a California Homeless Data Integration System 

Background Information 
At the July 11, 2018 Homeless Coordinating and Financing Council (Council) meeting, Chris Pitcher, an expert in HMIS and a consultant for the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), made a presentation to the Council regarding a state-level homeless data integration system. Mr. Pitcher’s assessment included three salient observations: (1) California has provided an unprecedented amount of funding toward the statewide homeless crisis; (2) California lacks the appropriate data infrastructure to measure the impact and effectiveness of various homelessness programs; and (3) without statewide data, California is trying to solve a problem that it does not have the data to fully understand. The Council’s Chair, Secretary Alexis Podesta, directed staff to explore options for developing a California Homeless Data Integration System (CHDIS), including a state-level Homeless Management Information System (HMIS). 

Since July 2018, HCFC staff, in collaboration with CDT and the HUD consultant, have:
• Held vendor demonstrations with vendors currently providing HMIS solutions to CoCs in California to gain a better understanding of the functions and capabilities of current HMIS operating in the state. HCFC also held demonstrations with other IT vendors that were interested in discussing capabilities of their IT solutions and how they might support the goals of a potential HDIS.
• Surveyed CoCs to learn more about how local jurisdictions administer their HMIS and how best practices and lessons learned at the local level could inform the state in developing a state HDIS. Extended interviews and site visits were conducted with current HMIS users in seven CoCs around the state to determine necessary requirements to build into a potential system and to consider options for improving on current HMIS software options. 
• Collaborated with the California Department of Technology (CDT) to identify challenges and opportunities related to a CHDIS project. 
• Submitted Stage I and Stage II Business Analysis documents required by CDT as part of the state IT project development process. 
• Published a Request for Information (RFI) that invited vendors to provide their proposed solutions to meet the goals of a CHDIS, as well as a cost estimate for their solution. Thirteen responses to the RFI were received on or before November 9, 2018, when the responses were due. 

As currently envisioned, the CHDIS would consist of two phases: 
• Phase I would include developing a state-level data warehouse that could import and integrate client-level data from all of California’s existing local HMIS and provide an option for CoCs to participate in a state HMIS if they choose to do so. The state HMIS would comply with HUD standards to facilitate federal reporting. Additionally, the proposed system would feature data analytics reporting tools, which would be available to both the state and CoCs. This would give the CoCs additional information to assist in policy setting and prioritizing services provided to homeless and at-risk individuals and families. In addition, it would allow the state to better understand the scope and characteristics of homelessness throughout California and begin to align state resources more effectively and efficiently with the needs of local communities. The Council would be in a position to provide data-driven advice on formulating sound policy and make recommendations on the most effective and efficient use of funds. 

• Phase II would include the development of an integrated platform that could import and link other client-level data from various state and local homeless programs, which would serve as a powerful, data driven tool used to inform policy and resourcing decisions. 

Frequently Asked Questions 


Question: Would CoCs be required to give up their current HMIS system? 
Answer: The CoCs would not be required to give up their current HMIS system. 

The proposed solution would include an option for CoCs to use a state-supported HMIS, which may reduce the burden felt by under-resourced CoCs currently maintaining an independent local HMIS. The state-supported HMIS would allow CoCs to directly enter data into the system, and the proposed system would comply with HUD standards to facilitate federal reporting. 

Whether individual CoCs decided to keep their own system or use the state-supported HMIS system, the Council envisions that client level data would be exported to the state’s database on a quarterly basis. If Phase II was implemented, the CoCs’ data would be integrated with the data from state departments that have programs or funding to address homelessness, which would provide critical insights into homelessness issues in California. 

Question: Would the state’s proposed data system track individual-level data?
Answer: Yes, the system would include the capacity to track individual-level data. 

This data is important to provide a comprehensive picture of the scope and demographics of homelessness in California, as well as the services and supports being provided. Council staff are working in close collaboration with CDT and data privacy/security experts to ensure the data system requirements would provide sufficient safeguards to protect sensitive data, as well as ensure compliance with all state and federal privacy and security laws. 

Question: What would be the benefit to CoCs participating in this project? 
Answer: The CoCs would be able to opt into the state HMIS as an alternative to administering their own CoC-level HMIS. 

All CoCs would gain access to a system that could integrate data and produce reports that provide feedback and local insights into homelessness, including alignment between programs and needs, opportunities for collaboration across programs, gaps in funding and services, and effective community strategies. The system would enhance both state and local entities’ ability to identify and develop effective strategies to reduce homelessness and better direct resources to ensure they have maximum impact in addressing the needs of California’s homeless.

Market Analysis 
Proposed IT projects in California must complete the Project Approval Lifecyle (PAL) process under the oversight of the California Department of Technology (CDT). The PAL process requires a thorough market analysis as a preliminary step to developing a specific IT solution. Throughout HCFC’s exploration of a potential HDIS, a consultant from HUD has provided expert advice and support, including information about how other states have implemented a statewide HDIS and what features of an IT solution are required by HUD for CoCs to be eligible for federal homelessness funding. 

Tuesday, August 27, 2019

Give Transit Riders
a Place to Sit Down

Dear Santa Rosa City Council and transit authority;

My name is Marji Brunelle a concerned citizen of Santa Rosa and homeless advocate. As a previously homeless person I feel I have some valuable insight into this issue and can bring some pertinent information forward so we may better serve our community. Having reviewed the 2019 Planning Commission Goals as well as traffic engineering's recommendations for improvement; I am sure you too will be interested in better serving our citizenry. 


I am particularly interested in including our homeless US veterans in access to services and community resources. As you may be aware that greater than 70 % of our current homeless population have resided in Sonoma county for greater than ten years prior to finding themselves homeless here, these homeless folks are our neighbors and long time Santa Rosa residents. Many of our homeless neighbors are veterans who have served our country, While Santa Rosa has made some progress in providing free bus rides and the beginnings veterans villages, there are many about 70% of our chronically homeless veterans still being under served and unsheltered.

Of the sheltered veterans temporarily housed at Sam Jones most if not all are disabled to some degree. Many with mobility, balance, endurance and pain concerns. This group of disabled veterans could be better served if they had access to the transit system to access community and social services located in the city center. As you may or may not know the bench at the Bus stop on the corner of Wright road has been removed preventing safe access to the bus system for someone with these mobility and balance concerns.

Beyond the ADA requirements, it just seems humane to provide a bench for folks who may have to wait up to 1.5 hours for a bus into town. These folks may have difficulty asking for and accessing governmental services and it behooves us to advocate for these veterans and neighbors who have served us. Having a vet with severe mobility issues not have a place to sit while waiting for a bus does not seem in line with our goals as set out by the SR city traffic engineers to regularly invest in transportation, roads and infrastructure to protect and sustain our assets. I would suggest that these people are our assets as these are the ones who have protected and served us.)

I think you will agree that this project to replace the bench on the corner of Wright road at the Sam Jones stop is in agreement with the SR planning commission goal to Increase Public Awareness of the overall homeless issues and generate support for constructive solutions particularly to assess the status of certain subgroups including our veterans many of which comprise the group of chronically homeless. Lets help them access the services needed to get housed and access health care. Thank you for your interest.

Marji Brunelle
August 26, 1019

Monday, July 29, 2019

August Mobile Health Clinic Schedule


AUGUST 2019 Mobile Health Clinic Schedule/AGOSTO 2019 Horario de la Clínica Móvil

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

First come first serve basis; Arrive early, space fills up quickly!
Donations of $15 for New Partients and $10 for Esrablished patients is suggested. If questions call 707 547-4612
Las personas se atienden en orden como van llegando. Las citas se llenan rápido!
Venga al principio de la clínica. Sugerimos donación de $15 para Nuevos pacientes, $10 Establecidos pacientes.


1
Santa Rosa
Resurrection Parish
9:00AM – 2:00PM

2            Sonoma
La Luz Center
9:00AM – 2:00PM

  


5          Santa Rosa

Redwood Gospel Mission
8:00AM-10:00AM
(open to the public, no Van, inside building)
Santa Rosa
Samuel Jones Hall
12:00 – 5:00PM

6           Windsor
Presbyterian Church
9:00AM – 12:00PM
Santa Rosa
The Palms Inn
1:00PM – 3:00PM

7              Santa Rosa
Redwood Gospel Mission
8:00AM-10:00AM
(open to public no Van, inside building)
Santa Rosa
Samuel Jones Hall
11:00AM – 2:00PM
8         Santa Rosa
Samuel Jones Hall
9:00AM – 12:00
(inside Hall not open to the public/ cerrado al publico)
Santa Rosa
Resurrection Parish
9:00AM – 2:00PM

9               Sonoma
La Luz Center
9:00AM – 2:00PM

12           Santa Rosa

Redwood Gospel Mission
8:00AM-10:00AM
(open to the public, no Van, inside building)
Santa Rosa
Samuel Jones Hall
12:00 – 5:00PM

13            Windsor
Presbyterian Church
9:00AM – 12:00PM
Santa Rosa
The Palms Inn
1:00PM – 3:00PM

14             Santa Rosa
Redwood Gospel Mission
8:00AM-10:00AM
(open to public no Van, inside building)
Santa Rosa
Samuel Jones Hall
             11:00AM-2:00PM
15

Clinic Admin Day
No service Today

Dia administrativo
No servicio Hoy

16             Sonoma
La Luz Center
9:00AM – 2:00PM

19        Santa Rosa
Redwood Gospel Mission
8:00AM-10:00AM
(open to the public, no Van, inside building)
Santa Rosa
Catholic Charities
Samuel L. Jones Hall
12:00  – 5:00PM  
20           Windsor
Presbyterian Church
9:00AM – 12:00PM


21              Santa Rosa
Samuel Jones Hall
9:00AM-12:00PM

22            Santa Rosa
Resurrection Parish
9:00AM – 2:00PM

23             Sonoma
La Luz Center
9:00AM – 2:00PM

26             Santa Rosa
Redwood Gospel Mission
8:00AM-10:00AM
(open to the public, no Van, inside building)
Santa Rosa
Catholic Charities
Samuel L. Jones Hall
12:00 – 5:00PM  
27           Windsor
Presbyterian Church
9:00AM – 12:00PM
Santa Rosa
The Palms Inn
1:00PM – 3:00PM
28           Santa Rosa
Redwood Gospel Mission
8:00AM-10:00AM
(open to public no Van, inside building)
Santa Rosa
Samuel Jones Hall
11:00AM-2:00PM


29           Santa Rosa
Samuel Jones Hall
9:00AM – 12:00
(inside Hall not open to the public/cerrado al publico)
Santa Rosa
Resurrection Parish
9:00AM – 2:00PM

30              Sonoma
La Luz Center
9:00AM – 2:00PM



Wednesday, July 24, 2019

Tonight at Olive Park

Alice Linn and I went to Olive Park around 6 pm tonight.  It was light out and a comfortable temperature.

Alice had cooked up two pans of pork, rice and peas which she offered people with applesauce on the side.  It was yummy.
I bought a case of thick black trash bags to hand out.

When we arrived there were 4-5 people hanging around near the picnic table.  We invited them over and spread out the food.  Over the course of about an hour we gave food to 15-20 people. Some were passing on the trail; others probably heard about the food or saw someone eating.

Most of them didn't stick around to talk much.  Some people said they'd talked to the police who'd been telling them to move out of the park, not saying Monday but saying "the park is closed."  One person said there were many homeless people over by Food Max.

Piece was there, the man who came to our meeting on Monday for the first time.  He took flyers and offered to spread them around.  There was one collection of belongings off the path down by the creek.  One of the people there said they were working on getting it organized so they could leave. Much of it was bundled and covered with plastic.

One man said he had been trying to get into the Sam Jones shelter for weeks.  I said that he should return on Monday morning and he'd probably get right in.  It's ironic but this is someone who might be helped by what is going to happen.

I've heard from some of you about what you've been finding when you talk to people in the sweep area.  I've heard that people are being cleared now; that no one is around in Olive Park; that people are further down the Joe Rodota Trail...

Please let me/us know if you go out.   Let's share what we learn.   People will be scattered. People will be hurt.  We can prevent some of that and document offenses for the court if we spend some time now talking and getting some of the paperwork set up.

Adrienne

Tonight at Olive, Prince Memorial

Hi Everyone,

Let me know if you are going out to the sweep
area tomorrow.

I walked for about three hours with Bryan tonight,
talking to people as we went from Olive Park to
a little past Dutton.  We started at 5 pm.

There weren't any major groups of tents. We
talked to about 20 people, some briefly, some
extensively.  People have already scattered
and left.  The police have been very active
already.  But, there were many people
around in 1s and 2s.  We found two major
camp sites and 4-5 small collections of property.
I imagine there is more "stuff" hidden in
bushes and kept far out of sight.  We gave
some people flyers and copies of the
resource guide/

As usual, people said kind, thoughtful and
appreciative things.  Some were questioning
or angry about the sweep.  One guy said
that Homeless Action! didn't really fight for
homeless people.  Another one seemed interested
in coming to one of our meetings.

Some of you know Bryan who joined me tonight.
He brought his photos of homeless people's dogs
to our meeting once.  Wonderful work!

He's got an exhibit up at the Center for Spiritual
Healing Mezzanine in Santa Rosa.
2075 Occidental Rd.  They'll be up for a few
months and you can see them whenever the
Center is open.

Let's gather on Monday morning between 6-7 am
at the East end of Olive Park, at the picnic table
near the bridge.  I'll bring protest signs and bags
people can use to pack up their belongings.

Adrienne
795-2890 home land line